Can Tux Go Mobile?

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As some people sardonically claim, the year of the Linux desktop is drawing near. However, when analyzing the current ecosystem I noticed that the near is an asymptote, not a fixed destination. I tried to draft a few priorities I think GNU/Linux needs to cover before becoming truly popular on mobile devices (laptops, notebooks, etc.).

1. Hardware support:

More and more hardware vendors openly support GNU/Linux as a platform and offer compatible drivers. However:

  • The only efficient solution for nVidia graphics is the closed-source driver, which is not fully open-source and does not support kernel mode-setting and other Unix-specific features
  • AMD and Intel GPUs have compatible drivers, but their performance is not on par with Windows and Mac OS X drivers
  • Intel, Atheros, Realtek and some other companies provide drivers for wireless network chips, though the coverage is far from complete
  • Features like brightness adjustment, suspend/wake up, fingerprint readers, etc. depend on so many interlaced components that their functionality is mostly down to sheer luck

Granted, most of the above works to a certain degree, though simply not to the same extent as with Windows or Mac OS X. It would really help if computer producers and vendors were to list the hardware components shipped inside their devices. Usually, that’s a tiny piece of information, though for us open-source people makes choosing well-supported hardware substantially easier.

2. Common software standards:

As it stands now, there are too many GNU/Linux distributions (Ubuntu flavor-of-the-week anyone?) with too many applications fulfilling common tasks. The variation in command-line network management tools comes to mind, though by no means is it the only such case. Don’t get me wrong, I adore choice. However, for vendors and third-party software developers too much variety makes understanding GNU/Linux the more confusing. A good idea would be to collaboratively decide on a set of low-level tools common to all distributions to unify at least the Linux base system more.

3. Emphasis on uniqueness:
GNU/Linux is viable as long as it’s an alternative to MacOS X and Windows. The more it mimics, the more it becomes a mere copy. However, mimicry may in many cases prove successful. For instance, KDE managed to expand on Windows’ standard desktop look, emphasizing functionality and ease of use. GNOME3, shunned by many for its bugs (now mostly resolved) and feature obfuscation is in fact a more approachable adaptation of Apple’s Aqua GUI. Many of us are so-called Unix veterans and we don’t care for user-friendliness much. However, end-users and vendors do and we die-hards should at least respect that. I think GNU/Linux, but also other Unices, has enough unique features to be considered an alternative to Windows or Mac OS X for many computing tasks.

To recapitulate, I think the year of the Linux desktop is not so far ahead anymore. In fact, it’s almost here! However, for the world to fully embrace it, open-source developers and hardware vendors should collaborate more. Both sides will surely profit from greater openness and trust.

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