Fear the GNOMEs No More!

For a very long time I have been a zealous proponent of minimalist desktop environments and window managers, loathing bloated creations such as KDE or GNOME with passion. It baffled me how many GNU/Linux distributions would ship with either of those by default (openSUSE, Debian, Fedora Linux, etc.). To me more usually meant less in terms of freedom and control. Then, I noticed how little time I have for playing around with Unices and that the computer should eventually serve me as a tool for software development, blogging, listening to music and such. Hence, with lots of initial twitching I decided to settle for one of the big DEs – GNOME3.

gnome_logo

Just to get a few things straight and out of the water – GNOME3 is not without vices:

  • Bearing in mind the dramatic change from GNOME2 to GNOME3 and how both MATE and Cinnamon are actually evolved instances of GNOME2, GNOME3 should be the one to fork and should not even hold the name GNOME. That would prevent a lot of pain, grudges and dissatisfaction.
  • Initial iterations of GNOME3 were riddled with bugs and made for a very unstable working environment.
  • When things go wrong with GNOME3, it’s difficult to troubleshoot due to the uninformative error notifications (Oops, something went wrong!).
  • To some GNOME3 may feel oversimplified and lacking in content.

Now, all of the above is absolutely true, however one has to consider that any new technology goes through extensive user hazing before things start working more often than not. KDE4 also received a shower of complaints when it was officially released. As of GNOME3 version 3.14, many of the previous bugs are gone or are at least significantly limited. Also, some of the bad reputation GNOME3 received was because Fedora shipped it before it was stable enough for daily use. I feel GNOME3 actually deserves some praise and does many things in a very intuitive way:

  • Rotating between opened apps and documents gives a minimized view of each window for inspection.
  • The main panel contains only the essential information, but supports notifications and extensions.
  • Favorite programs (shortcuts) can be placed in a left-sided dock, while more are accessible from the Applications menu.
  • The Applications menu lists only a number of apps at a time to avoid confusion.
  • The file manager Nautilus provides all of the most important features (view mode, hidden files toggle, folder creation, etc.) within barely 2 sub-menus.
  • It can still be customized to look slightly more classical!

I am still a GNU/Linux veteran at heart and for dated hardware I would surely select something more lightweight like Xfce or Openbox. However, on less limiting hardware I believe GNOME3 displays great snapiness and offers the bare essentials to make everyday computing just pleasant.

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2 thoughts on “Fear the GNOMEs No More!

  1. i liked gnome 2, and i wish the best to mate although the lack of (direct) support (particularly from debian) has cost them marketshare, i suspect.

    i liked nautilus too, but for years the gnome developers have pretty much destroyed their own desktop and told users in essence to “like it or suck it” so i went with the latter option: sucking it up and using something else. i wont go back. a note to devs: “meh.”

    worse than that, the same thing is happening to gtk. now i will really miss gtk, its a great loss– but its theirs to destroy if no one wants to fork it.

    the free software ecosystem right now is in peril, we have mostly gnome to thank. so no thanks, i will stick with other options. sometimes that xfce, which is too bad: xfce was always second best. funny how you can move to #1 by default. xfce didnt earn their position: gnome gave it away.

    Like

    • As I mentioned in the entry, GNOME3 is far from perfect. However, just today when doing another Manjaro Xfce iteration I saw that I’m spending far more time customizing my desktop than actually using it. As the Fedora folks claim, GNOME3 does restore some productivity, because it doesn’t get in your way too much :). Regarding GTK, yes, it is getting more and more bloated, but it’s still lighter than qt.

      Liked by 1 person

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