openSUSE Leap/Tumbleweed – A New Look

gecko_combined.png

I ran Fedora Workstation on one of my legacy MacBooks for several days. I was quite satisfied with it, however some things proved troublesome, like the GRUB2 config. At the end of the day, one realizes Fedora is best suited for Fedora developers and GNU/Linux novelty enthusiasts. Should one require a stable development platform, Fedora is probably not the top pick. On the other side of the Red Hat spectrum is CentOS, though its conservative approach to software updates makes it more suited to hardened enterprise
environments…What else do we have then?

In the realm of the Red Hat Package Manager (RPM), the European equivalent of Fedora is openSUSE. Few people now know that its predecessor, SUSE Linux was born slightly earlier than Red Hat proper and gained considerable acclaim in the enterprise sector. Along Red Hat, it was one of the options available for HP/CompaQ business desktop workstations. Quite obviously then, the openSUSE daughter project instantly garnered appeal. With its recent changes and closer ties to SUSE Linux Enterprise (SLE), it’s an interesting competitor to Fedora Linux.

openSUSE is available in two flavors – Leap 42.x (currently at point release 42.1) and Tumbleweed. The former is built from SLE packages, hence enterprise-level stability is a given. However, neither the kernel, nor the applications are as stale as in the case of CentOS. This is a great choice for people who want to Get Their Job Done and get on with their lives. The other flavor, Tumbleweed is a rolling-release spin with more bleeding-edge packages, geared rather towards software developers. It lacks some of the features of Leap 42.x and is surely not as ‘hardened’, though I consider it stable enough for day-to-day use. I am currently using it on my almost-OSS-friendly ASUS S301A ultrabook. Apart from the slightly too long boot process, everything is just swell.

Due to the fact that openSUSE relies heavily on GUI applications and systemd, I had strong negative feelings towards it in the past. It used to feel like a less locked-in alternative to MS Windows. However, openSUSE has gone a long way since the dusk of the 13.x line and improved in many regards. Also, I am no longer interested in init wars, since it’s quite clear what the enterprise standard is. I can either live with that or return to my batcave and resume my endeavors to save Linux City. In a moral sense it actually IS a dilemma, mind you!

I tested both Leap 42.1 and Tumbleweed on vastly different hardware and my impression is highly positive thus far. A single word to describe it would be ‘polished’. Something that was not so apparent in the 13.x line, but is all too obvious in Leap 42.1. Of course, one  cannot escape the impression that openSUSE resembles MS Windows. On second thought though, I consider this an advantage. The YaST2 Control Panel does a much better job than the well-known Windows Control Panel. Microsoft should take note of how minor incremental improvements, built on a graphically consistent foundation, can produce a more lasting effect, than a ‘Because 7 ate/8 9’ PR stunt. On the other hand, with the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS compat layer and virtual workspaces/desktops in Windows 10 it seems Microsoft is slowly catching up.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s