Software Design Be Like…

I stumbled upon this very accurate article from the always-fantastic Dedoimedo, recently. I don’t agree with the notion that replacing legacy software with new software is done only because old software is considered bad. Oftentimes we glorify software that was never written properly and throughout the years accumulated a load of even more ugly crust code as a means of patching core functionalities. At one point a rewrite is a given. However, I do fully agree with the observation that a lot of software nowadays is written with an unhealthy focus on developer experience, rather than user experience. Also, continuity in design should be assumed as sacred.

One of the things that ticks me off (much like it did in the case of the Dedoimedo author) is when developers emphasize how easy it is for prospective developers to continue working on their software. Not how useful it is to the average Joe, but how time-efficient it is to add code. It’s nice, but should not be emphasized so. Among the many characteristics a piece of software may have, I appreciate usefulness the most. Even in video games, mind you! Anything that makes the user spend less time on repetitive tasks is worth its weight in lines of code (or something of that sort). Features that developers consider useful are in reality not so to regular users way too often. Also, too many features are a bad thing. Build a core program with essential features only and mix in a scripting language to add features that users may require on a per-user basis. See: Vim, Emacs, Chimera, PyMOL, etc. Success guaranteed!

Another matter is software continuity. Backward-compatibility should be considered mandatory. It should be the number one priority of any software project as it’s the very reason people keep getting our software. FreeBSD is strong on backward-compatibility and that’s why it’s such a rock-solid operating system. New frameworks are good. New frameworks that break or remove important functionalities are bad. The user is king and he/she should always be able to perform their work without obstructions or having to re-learn something. Forcing users to re-learn every now and then is a *great* way of thinning out the user base. One of the top positions on my never-do list.

Finally, an important aspect of software design is good preparation. Do we want our software to be extensible? Do we want it to run fast and be multi-threaded? Certain features should be considered exhaustively from the very beginning of the project. Otherwise, we end up adding lots of unsafe glue code or hackish solutions that will break every time the core engine is updated. Also, never underestimate documentation. It’s not only for us, but also for the team leader and all of the future developers who *will* eventually work on our project. Properly describing I/O makes for an easier job for everyone!

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