The (Necessary?) GNU/Linux Fragmentation

I would like to share with you a story of my recent struggles with Debian. They’re partially my fault, but also partially due to the way Debian handles network management, which is quite different from how other GNU/Linux distributions do it.

The story begins with me being happy with a regular desktop install, powered by XFCE4, but then wanting to switch to the less distracting Openbox. I installed Openbox + extras like the tint2 panel, nitrogen (background/wallpaper setter) and other lightweight alternatives to XFCE4 components. While sweeping up XFCE4 leftovers, “apt autoremove” accidentally removed way too many packages, including network-manager. I was instantly left with no network connection and no means of restoring it, as I learned later. By default network management on Debian is handled by the ifupdown scripts, which “up” interfaces listed in /etc/network/interfaces and direct them to dhclient to get the DHCP lease or assign a static IP address. Incidentally, ifupdown utils have no means of directing wireless interfaces to wpa_supplicant for WPA-encrypted networks. Nowadays, this is handled by network-manager, which “Just Works”. network-manager uses wpa_supplicant to handle WPA-encryption (in addition to many other things), whilst performing the rest of network management itself. This is quite different from running wpa_supplicant directly, which simply failed in my case due to a known regression.

It’s quite sad to see that Debian, despite moving from init scripts to systemd for boot + service management, still insists on configuring network interfaces via Shell scripts (the mentioned ifupdown tools), while a mainstream solution in the form of network-manager is available! Why is it recommended as a “Just Works” alternative yet not offered by default? On Red Hat based distributions (say Fedora, CentOS, etc.) the matter is really simple – you get network-manager and you’re good to go out-of-the-box. That stands to reason, though, as Network Manager is a Red Hat project. Still, the “Just Works” approach baffles me (and disturbs even) greatly. “Just Works” sounds like a catch-phrase typical of commercial operating systems. Since they target desktop and laptop computers mainly, it’s enough if an ethernet interface and/or a wireless interface “just work”. What about servers with multiple NICs, routers, gateways, NATs and VMs, each having its IP address or set thereof? What then? Oh, right, we can write systemd units for each interface and control them via systemctl. Or use the ip utilities for a similar purpose. Or the deprecated ifconfig, which we shouldn’t use, but still can because it’s in the repositories of many distributions. Alternatively, perform DHCP requests via one of the selected clients – dhclient, dhcpcd, dhcpd, etc. We end up with a hodgepodge of programs that are best left to their own devices due to incomplete documentation and/or unclear configuration means. Each GNU/Linux distribution having a set of their own base utilities.

Personally, I feel that’s where the BSDs succeed. You get a clearly separated base system with well-documented and easily-configurable tools that are maintained as a whole. Network interface configuration borders on trivial. More so, the installer handles wireless connections almost seamlessly. Why is it so difficult on GNU/Linux? At this point, I believe the GNU/Linux community would profit greatly by agreeing on a common “base system”. Red Hat’s systemd is the first step to the unification of the ecosystem. While I am strongly opposed to systemd, because it gives merely the illusion of improved efficacy by simplifying configuration and obfuscating details, GNU/Linux should be a bit stronger on common standards, at least for system-level utilities.

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