The Kernel, the Kernel’s to Blame!

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When getting my Raspberry Pi 3 set up recently I experienced quite some woes concerning out-of-the-box detection of SD cards. One might expect that an SD card slot is nothing more than a USB-like interface. In theory yes, in practice quite some distributions have problems with accepting that fact. Gentoo failed me numerous times, though partially because I decided to go for an extremely slim kernel config. Manjaro also surprised me in that respect – SD card detected, but not as a USB drive (thereby, not mountable). Fedora and Lubuntu had no problems. Each distribution uses a different set of graphical utilities and desktop environments so users often blame the front-end setup. That’s wrong, though, because the inability of a system to detect a piece of hardware has everything to do with the kernel configuration. Indeed, the kernel’s to blame.

I personally prefer the Arch approach – almost everything as modules. Although this could add significant overhead due to the way modules are loaded, in reality it makes Arch-based systems very light on resources. After all, what’s not in, doesn’t get loaded at all. The drawback is that the distribution or the user is required to ascertain that the initramfs is complete enough to allow a successful boot-up. The alternative is to integrate as many drivers as necessary into the kernel, though that of course makes the kernel bulky and isn’t always the optimal solution. There is a lot in-between that unfortunately causes weird issues like the one I experienced.

I think there should seriously be some consensus between distribution teams regarding what goes into a kernel and what doesn’t. Weird accidents can be avoided and it’s down to individual teams to iron that out. Of course, one can go hunting for drivers on GitHub and trying out 5 versions of a Realtek 8188eu driver, but why should the user be required to do so?

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