In Software We Trust

Inspired by the works of Matthew D. Fuller from over-yonder.net I decided to write a more philosophical piece of my own. While distro-hopping recently it came to my mind that whatever we do with our lives, we never do it alone and our well-being depends on other people. It requires us to trust them. Back in prehistoric times a Homo sapiens individual could probably get away with fishing, foraging and hunting for food, and finding shelter in caves. The modern world is entirely different, though. We need dentists to check our teeth, we need groceries to gather food, we need real estate agents to find housing, etc. Dealing with hardware and software is similar. Either we build a machine ourselves or trust that some company X can do a good enough job for us. The same goes for software!

Alright, so we have a computer (or two, or ten, or…) and we want to make it useful by putting an operating system on its drive(s). MacOS X and MS Windows are out of the question for obvious reasons. That leaves us with either Linux or a BSD-based system. Assuming we pick Linux, we can install it from source or in binary form. This is where trust comes into play. We don’t need to trust major GNU/Linux distributions in terms of software packaging and features. We can roll with Gentoo, Linux From Scratch, CRUX or any other source-based distribution and decide on our own what does and doesn’t go into our software. It’s kind of like growing vegetables in a garden. Granted, we ourselves are responsible for any immediate issues like compile errors, file conflicts or missing features. It’s a learning process and one definitely profits from it. However, it’s also time-consuming and requires extremely good understanding of both system design and the feature sets of individual programs. No easy task that. Therefore, it’s far more convenient to use binary distributions like openSUSE, Ubuntu, Fedora, Debian, etc. It requires us to trust that the maintainers and developers are doing a good job at keeping software up-to-date, paying attention to security fixes and not letting bugs through. I myself don’t feel competent enough to be a source-level administrator of my own computer and be able to fix every minor or major issue in C++ code. I prefer to trust people who I’m sure would do it better than me, at least for now.

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