Mission: Saving Linux?

Recently, I was really into the BSDs and fiddled around with OpenBSD on some of my PCs. I still keep it on one laptop and FreeBSD on my main workstation. The point being that the BSDs are a lot more consistent, reliable and if something works out-of-the-box, it will most likely stay that way for a long while. Changes are incremental and major frameworks are not being reworked for semi-valid reasons, like oh, this looks old. Also, the very clearly superior BSD documentation – cannot go wrong with that!

Nowadays, Linux seems to be riddled with Windows-like problems. There is a surprisingly strong emphasis on easy-to-use GUI tools and hype for certain technologies (*cough* *cough* Docker) that are far from production-ready. The main rationale seems to be make it easy to set up. Everywhere I look there is loads of fluff. As Matthew Fuller put it in his discourse at over-yonder.net, we should be improving the back-end and extending it into usable front-ends, not the other way round. I agree, it’s important to enable people to do great things with technology, but if the how is there yet the why is missing, we’re not getting far. In addition, there is a lot of wheel re-inventing going on. People forget (or simply don’t know) that many of the great frameworks and tools were implemented already and can still be used effectively. Then, there is systemd (a case study on bad software engineering) and making Linux things so Linux-centric that portability suffers greatly (see: Docker being in fact Linux + Docker on non-Linux platforms). So there, we need a hero. Otherwise, we’re doomed to drown in self-indulgence.

A rather interesting idea would be to take the Linux kernel (for hardware compatibility reasons) and build a BSD-like operating system on top of it. Forget systemd, NetworkManager and other tools that try hard to do something that has already been done successfully. Leave the kernel + GNU coreutils in a steadily improving base and separate third-party software into package repositories. Also, one needs to start fresh – a clean slate to avoid the pitfalls of existing Linux distributions. In fact, there is already a project that tries to implement some of the BSD concepts in Linux and per my very preliminary impressions looks quite successful. Enter Void Linux!

Void seems to fill the gap (pun intended) between the Linux and BSD worlds aptly. There is a simple (limited?) init implementation called runit that takes care of starting the system as our favorite PID1, and launching service daemons to get a certain degree of persistence. It’s a typical Unix-like piece of software – does its job and swiftly moves aside to let us do ours. Then, there is the XBPS package manager and ports builder all-in-one framework. Think Arch’s ABS on steroids. Instead of OpenSSL we get OpenBSD’s LibreSSL (huge plus in my book!) and the musl C library alongside (but not on one installation, mind you) the traditional glibc. Speaking of C, all of these tools seem to be quite robust and xbps is perhaps the snappiest package manager I have seen in a while. Although the developer team is small, it’s doing a decent job at maintaining Void Linux. It’s a clear sign that it’s possible to run Linux without unnecessary bells and whistles, yet with all of the standard desktop features one might expect. My generic ASUS S301LA ultrabook handled Void Linux very well and all of its hardware was both supported and configured correctly (Intel WiFi Link 5100, SiS touchpad, AzureWave webcam, Intel HD 4400 graphics, WD-Green SSD, UEFI). Below a screenfetch rundown of the setup:

void_screencap

Now, it is true that finding a solution to 14 problems generates a 15th problem. There are certain aspects of Linux system design that I don’t completely agree with and adding orderly features on top of a Linux distribution mess doesn’t make the final product more organized. However, it’s a very successful step towards restoring some sanity to Linux Land that we lack so much nowadays.

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