On Using Computers

I’ve been planning to write this piece for a while now, though due to work related stuff I was somewhat hampered in my efforts. It’s a bit harsh at times, but I feel it should become a must read for beginner Linux users nevertheless.

I am a part of the open-source community and as a member I try to contribute to projects
with code, documentation and advice. I fully understand that for the open-source way of
producing content (not merely software!) to succeed, everyone has to give something. However, in the recent months I noticed a sharp influx of new users (newbies), who want to be part of the community, but are extremely confused as to its principles. Incidentally, these newbies “contaminate” the open-source community with former habits and expectations, and make it harder for both existing members and themselves to cope with this temporary shift in the user expertise equilibrium. I blame two main phenomena for the confusion of new users:

1. The open-source way is advertised as inherently “better”, which is misleading.

2. The open-source way requires members to think about what they do and possibly to contribute however they can.

Since the imbalance has reached a peak of being unbearable for me and other existing members of the open-source community, I decided to write this introductory article so that newbies quickly adjust and the equilibrium is restored.

I. User-friendliness is a lie
Following up on the thoughts laid out at over-yonder.org, I want to make this statement extra clear. There is no such thing as user-friendliness. It.does.not.exist. The Internet is crawling with click-bait articles entitled “The best user-friendly Linux distribution!” or “The most user-friendly desktop environment!”. These articles were crafted in order to increase the view count of the host website, not to provide useful information on the topic. Alternatively, they were written by people who are as confused as newbies. “User friendly” just like “intuitive” is a catchphrase – an advertising gimmick used to get you to buy/get a product. There is no extra depth to it. What people wrongly label as “user-friendly” is in fact “hand-holding” – the software/hardware is expected to do something for the user. Not enable the user to perform an action, but actually do the action for him/her. A stewardess on a cruiser or an aircraft is helpful, because she answers passengers’ questions, however she does not hold anyone’s hand, as that would mean leading every single passenger to their seat. If anyone ever tells you that something is user-friendly, ignore them and move on. You know better :).

II. Qualities, quantity and gradation
Generalized comparative statements are being thrown about virtually everywhere. This annoys me and should also annoy you after reading this paragraph. The truth is that most of those statements are fundamentally wrong, because they assume objects of different qualities can be compared using abstract terms. They CANNOT. A useful reference point is comparing apples to oranges. Can it be said that oranges are better than apples? No. What about apples being better than oranges? Neither! “Better” is an abstract term, which by itself means nothing. Therefore, saying “OpenSUSE is better than Ubuntu” means absolutely nothing, also! However, what can be done is comparing specific features of A and B. You cannot say “Apples are better than oranges”, but you can claim that an average apple is heavier than an average orange with specific examples of both. Color-wise, you can say that apples tend to be green-red, while oranges yellow-orange-reddish. You cannot directly compare colors, mind you, unless you express the color of A and B in a uniform color scale, like “the amount of red”. No fallacy has been committed that way. Therefore, neither software, nor hardware can be directly compared, though you can say, for instance that “openSUSE has a number of tools like YaST, which make it potentially more convenient for system administrators than Ubuntu”. Remember that!

III. The “use case” concept
Knowing that user-friendliness does not exist and that many things cannot be directly compared, the next step is understanding the “How” inherent to all problems. You have an issue or an inquiry. What is that you want to achieve? What are the exact requirements to reach your goal? What is the situation in which you experienced your problem? Being specific and being able to disassemble large problems into smaller tasks is paramount to understanding the problem and finding the possible solutions to it. This is true not only for computers, but for everything in life alike. Once you know your “use case”, you will know which hardware and software (including the operating system) to choose. Different operating systems cover various use cases or use scenarios, thereby understanding  your use case well will allow you to find the perfect operating system or any other piece of software quicker.

IV. Options, decisions and the “good enough”
All of the above being said, humans have this need to always aim for optimal solutions. Subconsciously,  they want only the “best” for them. What if it’s impossible to identify the best option? What if all of them satisfy our requirements equally well? Thus, the concept of “good enough” comes into play. Sometimes, the “best” solution is the first solution we decide upon and stick with it. No second thoughts allowed! Until we identify a legitimate reason why solution #1 no longer satisfies our needs for a prolonged period of time. Wondering which operating system to choose? Linux Mint? Ubuntu? Debian? Fedora? Perhaps not a Linux based OS, but a pure UNIX-like BSD? There are so many! If you’re a beginner, it doesn’t matter which you choose. Pick one, stick with it and change only if experimenting or your first choice was completely wrong.

V. Thinking and the individual responsibility
This will be a harsh one. Proprietary operating systems create this illusion of user friendliness (it’s a lie, we know it now!) and that the user is not required to take responsibility for his/her actions done on his/her software/hardware. This is one of the major fallacies in the computer world. The moment you buy a computer, you are completely responsible for it. Consider it your “child”. You need to make sure it’s always clean, powered up etc. No one will ever do it for you. Others can recommend solutions, give advice, provide support even, but the final decision is on you and you alone. Whatever you do with your computer, it is your success or failure. The primary reason why malware spreads like wildfire is that people are convinced that they don’t need to actively care for the safety of their computers. Dead. wrong.

The open-source way is not better than the proprietary/closed-source way. It’s different, nothing else. I chose it, because it aligns with my personal preferences well and I believe that it will prevail. It is for you to decide whether you can accept that. If the answer is “Yes”, I congratulate you. Go forth, learn and become a full-fledged member of the open-source community :).

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