Linux and the BSDs

Throughout my many months of using various open-source and proprietary operating systems I have made certain observations that might be useful to some. I started with Linux, though at some point migrated to the BSDs for personal and slightly more pragmatic reasons. I quickly became a lot more familiar with FreeBSD and OpenBSD than I ever was with openSUSE or Ubuntu. It may seem odd as Linux is far easier to get into, however seasoned UNIX admins will surely understand. BSDs have this technical appeal, which Linux steadily loses in favor of other features. To the point, though:

1. Save for Windows, most operating systems are extremely similar. macOS X, as it is now referred to, relies on a huge number of BSD utilities, because at one point in time they were more accessible (well-documented and permissively licensed). In turn, the open-source BSD family operating systems, such as OpenBSD and FreeBSD adopted Clang with its LLVM back-end (Apple’s compiler toolchain) as their main system compiler. A number of former, now defunct, proprietary operating systems were based on some revision of UNIX – IRIX, HP-UX, Solaris, etc. There is also a significant overlap of other tools, such as sysctl and ifconfig, which were forked, modified and adjusted to fit individual systems, but bare functional resemblance between various flavors of UNIX. The remainder (text editors, desktop environments, etc.) is typically BSD/MIT/GPL-licensed and available as packages or ports. Therefore, the high-level transition between BSDs and Linux isn’t as dramatic.

2. Above being said, the BSDs and Linux follow different philosophies, of which the BSD philosophy seems a lot more practical in the long-run to me. What most people forget (or never become familiar with) is the fact that Linux is just a kernel and development teams creating distributions (the actual Linux-based operating systems!) can do almost anything they want with it. This leads to myriads of possible feature sets already on the kernel level. It is also up to the distributions to assemble the kernel and userland utilities into a full-fledged operating system. Unfortunately, distribution teams are often tempted to add a bit of an artistic touch to their work, which causes Linux distributions to differ in key aspects. While on a higher level this is hardly noticeable, it may bite one back when things get sour or manual configuration is required. This Lego blocks or bazaar concept makes it difficult for upstream software developers to identify bugs and for companies to support Linux with hardware and software properly. Eventually, only certain distributions are recognized as significant, such as Ubuntu, CentOS, openSUSE, Fedora or Debian. BSDs take a more organized approach to system design, which I believe is highly advantageous. An operating system consists of the kernel and basic utilities, which make it actually useful, such as a network manager, compiler, process manager, etc. Depending on the BSD in question, the scope of the base system is defined differently. For instance, OpenBSD ships with quite some servers, including a display server (Xenocara). FreeBSD, in turn, focuses on providing server capabilities.

3. Recently (or not so much), the focus of Linux has switched from being merely a server platform to a desktop replacement. That’s the ballpark of MS Windows and macOS X, both of which are fairly tried as desktop platforms. The crux of the matter is that utilities had to be adjusted to fulfill more GUI-oriented roles, making command-line work slightly trickier. The other problem is that the software turnover in Linux-land is extremely rapid and programs either become stale way too quickly or they break too often. That’s clearly a no-go for server scenarios. This is where BSDs come in. FreeBSD was designed as a multi-purpose operating system, however with a strong focus on networking, process sandboxing and privilege separation, data storage, etc. In these aspects it clearly excels. NetBSD favors portability and supports many server and embedded platforms, which act as routers, switches, load-balancers, etc. OpenBSD emphasizes code correctness, security and complete documentation. Last, but not least, DragonflyBSD focuses on multi-processing and leverages filesystem features to improve performance. One could say that due to greater resources Linux surpassed all of these operating systems. However, one should not underestimate quality BSD utilities and the almost legendary stability of Berkley-derived OS’. One of the main problems I ever had with Linux was the inconsistent breakage of individual distributions. Upgrading packages would eventually render them useless or impossible to troubleshoot due to uninformative error messages. The lack or staleness of documentation made matters only worse. Having to deal with above problems, I simply jumped ship and joined the BSD crowd. Granted, neither OpenBSD nor FreeBSD make my PCs snappier. Quite the opposite, Linux still wins in that respect. However, I now have full access to the operating system source code and can fix issues first-hand should such a need arise. Not to mention being actually able to read clearly written documentation and learn how to use the tools my operating system offers. I doubt Linux can beat that.

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