How I migrate(d) to OpenSUSE and Why

I’m a die hard FreeBSD fan. I simply love it! It rubs me the right (UNIX) way. Through trials and tribulations I managed to make it do things it was possibly not designed to do. ZFS? Amazeballs. Cool factor over 9000! However, all of that came at a tremendous cost in energy and time. I reached a point when I don’t want to spend time manually configuring everything and needing to invent ways of automatizing things which should work out-of-the-box. Furthermore, most FreeBSD tools are not compatible with other operating systems, therefore learning FreeBSD (or any other BSD variant, for that matter) locks me in FreeBSD. Despite many incompatibilities, this is not the case with Linux. On a side note, the ZFS on Linux project was a great idea. The Linux ecosystem badly needed a mature storage-oriented filesystem, such as ZFS. BTRFS to me at least “is not there yet”. Other tools, such as containers were reinvented in some many different ways that Linux has outpaced FreeBSD many times over. Importantly, Linux tools were tested in many more real life scenarios and are in general more streamlined. For automation, this is crucial. Again, I don’t want to tinker with virtually every tool I intend to use. Neither do I want to read pages and pages of technical documents to get a simple container running. More so, I should not be forced to, since that’s terribly unproductive. Finally, I like to run the same operating system on most of my computers (be it i386, x86_64 or ARM). FreeBSD support for many desktop and laptop subsystems is spotty at best…

Enter OpenSUSE!

green_lizard

Cute lizard stock photo. Courtesy of the Interweb.

Seemingly, OpenSUSE addresses all of the above issues. True, ZFS support is not reliable and there are no plans to the contrary. The problem is as always licensing. BTRFS is still buggy enough to throw a surprise blow where it hurts the most. Personally, I don’t run RAID 5/6 setups, but that’s BTRFS’ biggest weakness right now. That and occasional “oh shit!” moments. Regardless, I think I’ll need to get used to it. Lots of backups, coffee and prayer – the bread & butter of a sysadmin. On the up side, this is virtually the only concern I have regarding OpenSUSE.

The clear positives:

  • Centralized system management via YaST2 (printers, bootloader, kernel parameters, virtual machines, databases, network servers, etc.). A command-line interface is also available for headless appliances. This is absolutely indispensable.
  • Access to extra software packages via semi-official repositories. Every tool or framework I needed was easily found. This is a much more scalable approach than the Debian/Ubuntu way of downloading ready .deb packages from vendors and having to watch out for updates. Big plus.
  • Impressive versatility. OpenSUSE is theoretically a desktop-oriented platform, though thanks to the many frameworks it offers, it works equally well on servers. In addition, there is the developer-centric rolling-release flavor, Tumbleweed, which tries to follow upstream projects closely. Very important when relying on core libraries like pandas or numpy in Python.

So far, I’ve switched my main desktop machines over to OpenSUSE, but I’m also testing its capabilities as a KVM host and database server. Wish me luck!

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