We Are Developers 2018 – Day 2

Day 2 of the We Are Developers World Congress is up (at least for me, since I don’t have enough stamina for both the after-party and another full day of talks). Compared to day 1, I made some progress on the food and water front. The local grocery store, Hofer proved extremely useful. Armed with bacon buns and non-sparkling water I was ready for more developer-flavored bliss!

Alas, the first presentation was slightly disappointing. Instead of a talk about accelerated learning, I got a lecture on how learning works, from which I learned nothing. Thankfully, the second talk fully compensated for the shortcomings of the first one. Enter Brenda Romero – one of the legends of game development (think Wizardry 1-8). This talk was doubly important for me, because I would really love to join the game development “circus”, but I’m not yet sure whether I have the guts (or a “more-than-mellow” liver). I’m still not sure, but the take-home message was crystal clear – just do it! Brenda had a lot of important things to say regarding not giving up and not taking comments from others too personally. The audience can be brutal and vicious, and the gaming industry itself is tough. At least I know what I’m up against!

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Brenda Romero (centre) talking about her childhood toy assembling endeavors

Numero tertio was a continuation of game development goodness. I originally intended to attend the AI talk by Lassi Kurkijarvi, but John Romero. I don’t think I need to say more to anyone who at least heard of Quake or Doom. It was not a replay of last year’s talk, mind you! Rather, we got a full story of Doom’s development, which to me was both interesting and inspiring. John Romero is an amazing game developer and the pace at which he, John Carmack and other programmers at idSoftware produced Doom was simply dazzling. While modern games are of course a lot more complex, developers from the early 1990s didn’t have the tools, such as SDKs or version control we now possess.

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John Romero (centre) on developing and shipping Doom

 

Later on, it just spiraled! I lost track of the talks a bit, since there was some major reshuffling in the schedule. The presentation from Tessa Mero on ChatOps at Cisco was quite interesting. I do use Slack and various IRC clients, but a greater need for ChatOps and its integration with the software development cycle is definitely there. I wasn’t fully aware of that, to be completely honest. Next, Tereza Iofciu from mytaxi gave us a tour of machine learning and showed us the importance of computer algorithms in predictive cab distribution planning. It wasn’t about self-driving cars or reducing manpower, but rather about reducing the load on drivers and improving clientele’s satisfaction. Computer-accelerated supply-demand, so to speak.

In the afternoon I took an accidental detour to a book-signing event hosted by John and Brenda Romero. Not only did I get a chance to talk to them personally (*heavy breathing!*), but also got a copy of Masters of Doom signed (*more heavy breathing!*). John said that if I read it, I’ll definitely get into game development professionally. I’m completely embracing the idea as I type this. One of the last talks I attended was given by Yan Cui on how he used the Akka actor model implementation (together with Netty) to solve latency issues in a mobile multiplayer game (MMO specifically). Obviously, it was a success and his convincing speech makes me want to try it out. It’s about concurrency, but without the overhead of traditional multiprocessing and/or multithreading. Although I don’t code in C# just yet, there is a Python implementation of Akka, which was recently recommended to me.

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Yan Cui (centre) explaining message relays in the actor model of concurrent programming

In summary, it was great to meet like-minded folks and actually talk to fellow game developers, who like challenges and don’t shy away from trying out new approaches to software design. Perhaps that’s what I’m looking for – challenges? Stay tuned for more exciting impressions from day 3 of the Congress!

 

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