We Are Developers 2018 – Day 3

Finally, day 3 of the Congress. My morning preparations were the same as on the previous day – water, food and loads of coffee to get my gears running. I was locked & loaded for 8 whopping talks. Since it would take me hours to write about all of them, I will only briefly summarize each.

First off was Philipp Krenn from Elastic, talking about the ELK stack (ElasticSearch + Logstash + Kibana). Apparently, the stack has a new member called Beats. It helps with creating handlers for specific types of data streams (file-based, metrics, network packets, etc.). I feel like that feature was missing in the current composition of the stack, though it only makes the stack bigger and more complex. I was actually investigating the use of Logstash + ElasticSearch + Grafana for sorting, filtering and cherry-picking log messages, but the maintenance overhead was a bit too much. I settled with Telegraf + InfluxDB (time-series SQL-like storage back-end) + Grafana. Telegraf’s logparser plugin simulates Logstash and InfluxDB proved to be an extremely robust storage solution. In addition, Grafana’s ability to handle ElasticSearch records was too rigid (pun intended) for our use case. So in general, it’s a “no”, but I’ll keep my log files open for new options in case/when our framework grows.

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Catalina Butnaru (right) show-casing various AI assessment frameworks

Second up, Catalina Butnaru on AI, however from an ethics perspective. Frankly, I am allergic to ethics and including it in discussions about AI, because ethics often derails or postpones progress. However, Catalina nailed it. Her talk was extremely appealing and real. I learned that ethical considerations should not go into the “wontfix” bucket and genuinely affect all of us. Well done!

Next, Joe Sepi from IBM talked about getting involved in open-source communities and helping build better software together. His recollection was quite personal, because he had to suffer from the same prejudices all of us fear when delving into an alien new project, framework or programming language. The take-home message? Never give up! Fork, commit, send PRs, make software better. Together.

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I skipped Martin Wezowski‘s talk to save my (metaphorically) dying stomach, but made it to the presentation from Angie Jones (Twitter). She’s an incredibly engaging speaker and the points she raised really resonated with me. All of us write (or should write!) unit and function tests. However, how do you test a machine learning algorithm or neural network? How do you simulate a client of a shop app or a human target of an image recognition module? It turns out that when dealing with people, machine learning can prove finicky and extremely error-prone. Actually, to the point when it’s funny. Until we begin discussing morbid matters like How many kids need to jump in front of an autonomous car for it to slide off a cliff and kill its passengers? 2? 5? 6? or Why does an image recognition application recognize people of darker skin tone as gorillas? Was there a race prejudice when selecting test image sets? 10 points to Angie Jones for the important lesson!

The next talk was given by Diana Vysoka, a young developer advocate, working for the We Are Developer World Congress organization. On one hand, I feel quite old seeing teenagers get into programming. On the other hand, that’s encouraging in terms of our civilization’s future. Listening to people like her makes me still want to live on this planet.

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Eric Steinberger (right) making convolutional neural networks plain and simple!

If Diana is a rising star, Eric Steinberger is already one for some time. A math and IT prodigy who can explain extremely complex concepts in such simple words that even a fart like me can comprehend them. He believes that AGI (Artificial General Intelligence) is possible and I believe him. After all, how do we define the requirements for AGI, compared to a standard neural network, which can already be purposed for almost any task? Obviously, we should aim higher than simple bio-mimicry. As humans we’re flawed and our potential is limited. Let’s not unnecessarily handicap the development of AI!

Finally, the last talk. Enter Joel Spolsky, the creator of StackOverflow! I attended his talk last year and was ready for more awesomeness. Joel delivered. Continuously. His anecdotes and stories gave a perfect closure to the Congress. It’s great to be a software developer and meet so many amazing people in one place. See you there next year!

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