DevOps Oversimplified

To begin with, DevOps is one of those newfangled expressions in the IT ecosystem, which are currently hip and trendy, but cause a grimace on the faces of older system administrators. Before, we relied on cron and the flimsy magic of throwaway Shell scripts to manage system daemons. Now, we have Ansible, Docker and other sexy new tools which bridge the gap between software development and deployment. I still have some reservations towards Docker, though I really enjoy using Ansible in my pseudo-sysadmin workflow. The truth is that all of these tools have their place and are astonishingly powerful when used correctly. As a person who worked with multiple UNIX-like and non-UNIX operating systems, I can definitely claim that your millage may vary. Different scenarios require different tools and no tool is universal enough to work on all operating systems. Portability is a bit of an Eldorado which we all aim for, though never really reach. The other aspect is skepticism. I shudder every time I see adoption before comprehension. People notice something is cool, then just take it and use it right away, completely ignoring the How and What if. That is essentially what this article is all about!

Paper magazines are a bit of a dying concept, especially in the IT world. Stack Overflow is a Google / DuckDuckGo search away (to the left from your local booze supplier, can’t miss it!). Nevertheless, they’re an important part of my childhood and buying them in a way supports the open-source cause. Therefore, I purchase an issue from time to time. Unfortunately…

itsatrap

The article on Amazon Web Services (AWS) and managing virtual machine images looked interesting at a glance. I never worked with the AWS, therefore I decided to give it a go. The first thing that hit me was choosing Ubuntu 16.04 LTS as the guest operating system. I have nothing against Ubuntu as I use it at work as well, but what most people forget is that Debian and Ubuntu have quirks, which other Linux distributions lack. Most importantly, though – What is the use case? That is the first question which should be addressed when choosing a distribution. In fact, I would argue that if the article is meant to be useful professionally, CentOS, RedHat or openSUSE are better picks. That’s being needlessly pedantic, of course. Chances are the addressee of the article used Ubuntu before and has some experience with it.

Later, I find the phrase the package manager holds <package>. Personally, I have never seen this expression. Everyone talks/writes/types about repositories (repos). The only thing the package manager holds is a cache of the repository state to know which packages are available without having to ping the repository every single time. Again, that’s merely nitpicking. The thing that really disturbed me appeared several lines later:


pip install awscli

In 99% of the cases, this command will fail as it is typically executed from a regular user’s login session. By default, the pip script disallows installation of external Python libraries system-wide, and for perfectly valid reasons. If it somehow works, however, we’re in deep trouble. The worst that can happen is overwriting system-level Python libraries. For a more Windows-like reference, imagine altering the default DirectX installation. Pandemonium. A slightly better way to do this is:


pip install --user awscli

This will guarantee that libraries are installed into the user’s $HOME/.local/lib sub-directory and the wrapper scripts into $HOME/.local/bin. An even better way to do it is:


python2 -m pip install --user awscli

Thus, we specify the Python version for which we want to download the library and our approach is portable across multiple UNIX-like operating systems. PIP, as executed via “pip install”, is merely a wrapper script, which may or may not be offered by a Linux distribution and may or may not point to Python 2. Hell, in some cases it might even be buggy! The assumptions in the article went downhill hereafter. They made it really difficult for me to trust anything the writer stated unless tested thoroughly. The Internet is full of AWS horror stories already.

What this article demonstrates and what I think is extremely hurtful to the Linux ecosystem is bad practices and naive assumptions. Every Linux distribution is a Ubuntu, every Shell is Bash, etc. All of it, because people are encouraged to disregard core aspects of UNIX system management. One of my recent woes was when a company provided printer drivers as a URL to a Shell installation script. The recommended procedure was downloading the script via cURL and piping it directly to Bash with elevated privileges. Absolute madness!

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